From Sex Ed to Sexual Assault

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From Sex Ed to Sexual Assault

An iconic image of a women displaying rape in a distinctive way.

An iconic image of a women displaying rape in a distinctive way.

An iconic image of a women displaying rape in a distinctive way.

An iconic image of a women displaying rape in a distinctive way.

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Aniah Reid

From Sex Ed to Sexual Assault

According to Rainn.org, “every 98 seconds an American is sexually assaulted,” which is one of the most common occurred issues in modern society; it is likely for you or someone you know to become a part of this statistic.

Sexual violence is something that gets little to no attention in the classroom. At UACHS, for example, students take two years of health and a quarter of sexual education, yet, teachers never touch upon the sensitive topic. Therefore, teachers should be more hands on and willing to open a conversation amongst students about sexual assault.

Refusing to shine a light on a problem as severe as rape, alters the students vision of real societal problems. After all, high school is supposed to prepare you for ‘the real world’. The only exposure UACHS students receive pertaining to this topic is a PowerPoint slide during respect week explaining different types of respects and disrespects in relationships; which barely dabbles on the subject accordingly. Social Worker, K. Terry, explains how sexual assault can take a tole on a person severely.

“Your academic future or your future career can be ruined if you don’t have emotional intelligence, or the ability to have stable emotions and manage your emotions; and also know what’s appropriate and what’s not appropriate sexual wise,” said Terry.

       The earlier we prepare the highschool audience, the more socially inclined they become to sexual assault scenarios.

This problem is not only about the likelihood of it happening to you or someone you know, but also about being able to approach topics and situations like rape and sexual assault in a proper manner.

For instance, seniors who will be walking into the thresholds of big universities, will finally be getting their shot at freedom and success. Feeling as if they have never been more alive, until reality kicks in and sexual assault is the talk of the campus. Whether it be scenarios or public conversations; sexual assault might be ambushed into their daily lives.

Social worker,  A. Kaliades, made a valid point about the upperclassmen of UACHS.

      “As the seniors go through this transition and they’re in a new place with new people,” said Kaliades. “They want to really be armed with the idea of what’s appropriate and safe and consensual behavior and what’s not.”

After conducting a survey among a total of 60 students across grades 9-12 about sexual assault, it was found that out of 15 freshmans, only 5 knew someone who was sexually harassed and out of 15 seniors, 7 knew someone who was sexually harassed. Given the statistics, by your senior year, you are likely to know at least two more people who have been sexually assaulted.

According to NJ.com, “Rutgers university, the state’s largest university, reported 32 rapes on its New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, the most in New Jersey and tied for seventh highest in the nation.”

The younger audience, such as highschool students, are oblivious to what happens in the real world. In fact, younger people are at higher risk of sexual violence; ages 18-34 are 54% are more inclined to encounter sexual assault than other ages according to Rainn.org. Of course information this vulgar would not be on a college brochure cover. Therefore, high school students should be more educated on the information of sexual abuse especially with the climax of today’s issues.

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